01 March 2017

[Review] How To Run A Kickstarter

Kick Starter (KS) has attracted various types of projects since its inception. Though there are folks who malign KS, deservedly so in a few cases, I would be the first to point out this a shortcoming of the format of KS offerings and the individuals behind those projects, not the KS folks themselves. I could spend a lot of time slamming certain notorious KS meltdowns, ranging from projects which began with good intentions but failed to deliver, to what appear to be outright confidence games intended to fleece people.

This is not a post about that, and I'd appreciate it if you would take discussions about such elsewhere.

Let me point out before I go further I've backed 9 KS projects:
  • I received the correct rewards for my level of patronage every time. Yes I did; every one, every time. 
  • The reward matched the description on the KS page.
  • All but one project delivered later than promised, but only one of those eight was delivered more than a month or two later than promised. 
  • In every case I received clear and (more importantly) believable communication from the responsible party or parties that (a) my project was late, (b) the reasons for the delay, and (c) a reasonable estimate of when I could expect my reward(s) to arrive. 
So, not a bad track record overall. I agree with KS in that I'm not buying a product so much as I'm supporting the development of a product. In light of my apparently unusual success with KS, what does it take to stand out from that crowd?

Douglas H. Cole and Gaming Ballistic LLC's Kickstarter Dungeon Grappling (DG). I was impressed on so many levels with how Cole conducted this project. I received constant communication about DG, fun things to read, my input/feedback was sought, and my e-mails were answered promptly (I sent two over the course of the KS campaign).

It wasn't just the communication. The product itself was exactly as advertised, save where backer feedback suggested changes the majority thought were a good idea. It was delivered on time and securely packaged to prevent damage to the product (I once received a badly damaged "collector's" version of a KS product due to the way it was packaged, no I won't tell you which one).

Now when the project is winding down? Cole is still seeking feedback. Are we happy with the product? What else would we like to see? Would we be interested in this semi-related product and here's what else the company has in the works. And, most importantly of all? Has everyone received all their rewards and are there any issues or problems with what they've received?

This is how to run a Kickstarter! Know your product, know your capabilities, know your audience. If the first 3 rules of a brick-n-mortar store are location, location, location then I'd say the first 3 rules of KS are communication, communication, communication!

Neither I, Cameron DuBeers, nor my Wobbly Goblin Press are employed by or affiliated with  Mr. Cole or Gaming Ballistic LLC. I'm just a gamer impressed to hell and gone by a well-run Kickstarter campaign.


  1. Thanks for this! I did my best to treat my backers as if they were partners in the exercise, and intend to run my next two crowdfunding projects the same way.

  2. My pleasure! Folks can be quick to point out poor service but slow to talk up great service. I like to be the positive counterbalance!